GREED, POWER AND THE DEMISE OF THE HUMMER


PINK REDNECK RIDE

My Ride's Bigger Than Your Ride!

General Motors  Hummer,  long the choice of wealthy, pretentious, self-absorbed, egomaniacs has been a loss leader ever since the crude hit the fan.  Swollen, lurching, gaudy and imposing, the Hummer always projected an air of “F*#k off, ass munch–you wanna’ care about the environment, step aside…I got work to do.”

After months of sleepless nights wondering with what to do with Hummer, “Generous Mothers,” (a per name  UAW members  use for GM,)  announced the swollen behemoths  will no longer be built in America.  A preliminary deal is in place for its sale to a foreign firm. Rumor has it that the buyer is Chinese.

After joining Chrysler in bankruptcy, GM seeks ways to erase  decades of debt to rise triumphantly from its smoldering ashes.  GM’s last posted profits  in 2004.  Since then, 88 billion dollars have slipped through its fingers.

Hummer’s sale is considered ancillary to other ideas under consideration to make the ailing company financially viable.

I thought the Hummer a dud at first glance, which for me was in 1982 , when I saw the butt-ugly bruiser being built in South Bend by AM General for the military (they also built a revivalist version of the Studebaker “Avanti,” which I thought was pretty sweet.)  Even among popular land  schooners of the day (like the Electra 225 and Oldsmobile 98,)  the Hummer was formidable– more akin to something useful to explore  the moon’s surface than to move people and things about the blue planet.

Its utility came from its flexibility, brute strength and ability to conquer challenging terrain. When I noticed its fuel consumption–6 miles to the gallon (gas was around 80 cents a gallon)–I thought that  along with its base price of $28k, (my Accord cost $7,000)  it was totally impractical for mass use, even by a military noted for reckless spending.  I was young and naive.

The Hummer did prove to be a valuable military vehicle but wound up being asked to do too much.  Years later, with gas hovering at $1.60, I was amazed to hear that GM was sincerely interested in adapting this battering ram of a vehicle for consumer use.  The rest is history.  GM was right.

Self-absorbed narcissists responded in droves.  As a domestic vehicle, it was just plain stupid.  Still, there were waiting lists for these belligerent box-like bastard sons bred when American greed met Reaganomics at its worst.  But at least I’m on record as hating them on sight.

It’s hard to find empathy for corporations that make such obviously bad decisions, but growing up near Lordstown, I’ve always had a love-hate relationship with GM.  They screwed some of my best friends, but had it not been GM, I suppose it well could have been someone else. I just hope they can –that we ALL  can recover from this.

More here

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Soup du jour and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to GREED, POWER AND THE DEMISE OF THE HUMMER

  1. Lynn says:

    interesting post. we think alike. thanks.

  2. Paul Sonderman says:

    Thanks for reading and commenting. Regarding thinking like me, you may want to consider seeing a health care professional!

  3. Jake says:

    I am a Republican that voted for Ronald Reagan and I never agreed with the waste that the Hummer was for public comsuption.
    I do let pass the cheap shot to Reaganomics. Some people just can not not help themselves.
    I suppose I could guess on what side of the political spectrum you stand.
    So, any thoughts on the 3 jets for Congressional use costing millions that the administration included in the budget while not long ago chastizing the CEOs for using.
    Some blades are double sided, my friend.
    Maybe you should consider proffesional help, I am thinking the Dalai Lama because your ego is making you suffer.
    Hipocrasy is a direct result of an over inflated ego.

  4. Paul Sonderman says:

    Jake,

    First, since I don’t know you, I find your patronizing use of the term “friend” is misdirected. Secondly, if you feel that Reaganomics was a glorious success unreplicated or not improved upon in the course of subsequent American history, no facts or evidence I produce to the contrary here is likely to convince you otherwise.

    Given your other comments, your apparent agreement that the the Hummer constituted then a new low in demonstrating the superiority of free market capitalism is either praiseworthy or unsettling.

    Re what I believe, why “guess” when my Bio clearly states “Paul is a life-long liberal, a practicing Catholic and a believer in social justice.”

    As playbook dictates, you attempt to misdirect, changing the argument to something that broke today, long after I wrote the post to which you responded. http://www.rollcall.com/media/37552-1.html

    I’ll do some more research before I comment. I suggest you do the same, including on the true impact of Reaganomics, which is far from “Holy Grail” the GOP claims.

    Despite our obvious disagreement, I won’t, however, resort to insults. I won’t deduce anything of who you are from what you wrote–other than that you appear disingenuous and conservative. I won’t suggest you seek any professional help, just a public library.

    Thanks for reading, assuming so much, commenting and well, just being you!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s